Tony Wellington

Tony Wellington
Former Mayor of Noosa, author, photographer, artist, film-maker, lecturer, musician, social commentator and environmentalist.

Noosa: the great irony

The great irony for tourism destinations goes like this: the more you make a place wonderful, both to live and visit, the more you attract people that will ultimately undermine the very qualities that make the location so appealing.

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Don’t let the turkeys get you down

Brush-turkeys were hunted for food in the Great Depression and nearly disappeared. My 1992 edition of The Australian Museum’s Encyclopedia of Australian Animals lists these creatures as “possibly endangered”. To anyone living in Noosa, such a suggestion seems absurd.  Brush-turkeys

Read More »

The battling rhinos of Noosa

What’s the strongest creature in the world? The gorilla I hear you suggest? Or perhaps the elephant, or maybe even the humble ant? Nope, it’s the Rhinoceros Beetle. They are reportedly capable of lifting 850 times their own body weight,

Read More »

Old MacDonald had a dam (here in Noosa)

Over the years I have made hundreds of early morning visits to the Fearnley Bird Hide off Grange Road on the edge of Lake Macdonald. Egrets, herons, ibis, ducks, swans, grebes, darters, coots, cormorants, terns and swamphen regularly kept me

Read More »

The richness of West Cooroy

From pademelons to land mullets, paradise riflebirds to neon cuckoo bees, West Cooroy State Forest is brimming with fascinating wildlife.  The state government has promised to transfer West Cooroy State Forest into national park by the end of the year.

Read More »

Some home truths about nesting boxes

Most people are aware that we hominids have robbed our native wildlife of essential tree hollows. Urbanization, clearing for agriculture and our general dislike of dead trees have all played their part in the shortage of available nesting hollows. So

Read More »

Have you seen these tiny travellers ?

Dwarf Tree Frogs, aka Eastern Sedge Frogs, are tiny little frogs with great big voices. As a result, they are more often heard than seen. They make a classic frog noise, described as a ratchet-like “reeek-pip”. Like diminutive barometers, they

Read More »

The Coat of Many Colours

The Wompoo Fruit-Dove is a riot of colour, as though a pigeon has been coloured in by a toddler with a new set of paints.  These birds are not often seen, as they tend to hang about high up in

Read More »

The Masked Spear Carriers on your lawn

The Masked Lapwing (also known as the Spur-winged Plover) has benefitted from human development. Like humans, these handsome birds are rather partial to open grassed areas, from where they can command a good view of their surroundings. Mown lawns and

Read More »

Noosa: the great irony

The great irony for tourism destinations goes like this: the more you make a place wonderful, both to live and visit, the more you attract people that will ultimately undermine the very qualities that make the location so appealing.

Read More »

Don’t let the turkeys get you down

Brush-turkeys were hunted for food in the Great Depression and nearly disappeared. My 1992 edition of The Australian Museum’s Encyclopedia of Australian Animals lists these creatures as “possibly endangered”. To anyone living in Noosa, such a suggestion seems absurd.  Brush-turkeys

Read More »

The battling rhinos of Noosa

What’s the strongest creature in the world? The gorilla I hear you suggest? Or perhaps the elephant, or maybe even the humble ant? Nope, it’s the Rhinoceros Beetle. They are reportedly capable of lifting 850 times their own body weight,

Read More »

Old MacDonald had a dam (here in Noosa)

Over the years I have made hundreds of early morning visits to the Fearnley Bird Hide off Grange Road on the edge of Lake Macdonald. Egrets, herons, ibis, ducks, swans, grebes, darters, coots, cormorants, terns and swamphen regularly kept me

Read More »

The richness of West Cooroy

From pademelons to land mullets, paradise riflebirds to neon cuckoo bees, West Cooroy State Forest is brimming with fascinating wildlife.  The state government has promised to transfer West Cooroy State Forest into national park by the end of the year.

Read More »

Some home truths about nesting boxes

Most people are aware that we hominids have robbed our native wildlife of essential tree hollows. Urbanization, clearing for agriculture and our general dislike of dead trees have all played their part in the shortage of available nesting hollows. So

Read More »

Have you seen these tiny travellers ?

Dwarf Tree Frogs, aka Eastern Sedge Frogs, are tiny little frogs with great big voices. As a result, they are more often heard than seen. They make a classic frog noise, described as a ratchet-like “reeek-pip”. Like diminutive barometers, they

Read More »

The Coat of Many Colours

The Wompoo Fruit-Dove is a riot of colour, as though a pigeon has been coloured in by a toddler with a new set of paints.  These birds are not often seen, as they tend to hang about high up in

Read More »

The Masked Spear Carriers on your lawn

The Masked Lapwing (also known as the Spur-winged Plover) has benefitted from human development. Like humans, these handsome birds are rather partial to open grassed areas, from where they can command a good view of their surroundings. Mown lawns and

Read More »